Worry Time | Counseling | Therapy

Worry Time : Therapy in Philadelphia, Ocean City, Mechanicsville

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Samantha Eisenberg, LCSW, MSW, MEd, LMT, (Therapist)

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Do you often find yourself worrying about events in the future? And not just worrying a little, sometimes worry that can get so big it stops you from wanting or being able to do anything else but worry. When worries get so big that they start to get in the way of your day to day life, they start to impact you in all sorts of ways. Here are some ways that constant worrying can impact you:

  • Trouble with sleep

  • Trouble with mood regulation

  • Increased irritability

  • Anxiety or feeling overwhelmed

  • Trouble with focus or concentration


Odds are that if this type of worry is something you struggle with, that you have been looking for ways to either reduce the worry or the impact it has on your life. A tip that may help you reach this goal is incorporating a specific worry time into your daily routine.


What is worry time?

Worry time is a time that is set aside and specifically scheduled in your day to allow you to have time to worry. This could be in whatever increment that you chose, some people think 15 minutes is enough time to set aside while some people use closer to an hour.


It may seem counterintuitive to set aside time specifically for worrying if the goal is for you to worry less, but there is a method to the madness! Dedicating time later in the day can help decrease the amount and intensity of worries experienced during the day. In order to understand worry time better, let's help get you set up with what you’ll need for worry time!


What do I need?

  • Worries: all shapes and sizes welcome!

  • A method of keeping track of worries: this can be done by traditional methods like pen and paper, a notes app on your phone, recording via voice memos on your phone, or another thought recording app (one of my favorites is Emotionary!)

  • An identified time frame just for worrying that feels comfortable for you


How do I use worry time?

Anytime a worry crosses your mind, write it down in your record keeping method and tell the thought that you understand its importance but that worrying about it right now isn’t productive, but that you’ll give it the attention it deserves during your identified worry time. Below is an example of what this kind of record keeping may look like to help get started!


Worry & Situation that caused worry

Emotion

Intensity of emotion/worry (1-10)

Related thoughts

E.x. worried a friend is mad at me because they didn’t respond to a text

Fear, sadness

Level 5

What if they don’t like me anymore?

Did I do anything wrong?

I don’t want to be lonely



At your identified worry time, grab your worry log and allow yourself to worry about each item. Ask questions about them--are they all still as important as they were when you were worried about them? Are there any overarching themes? Are there any possible solutions? Are the worries based on facts? Below is another example of a way to address the worry during your worry time. If worry time starts to feel overwhelming, always feel free to transition into a self-care activity or grounding activity, or address the worry with a professional.


Worry & Theme

What are the facts?

What can be done?

How important is this? (1-10)

Worst case scenario & how likely

Plan to address worry

E.x. friend didn’t answer text --theme of relationships

She never said she was mad at me

She is on vacation

She was not mad last time we talked, and I have not done anything since

I could ask her if she is mad at me when she responds, if I am still worried by her response.

2, I don’t have any facts to back up she is mad, but I want to ensure my friendship is okay

She is mad, and we talk about why

I will wait for her to text me back and ask if she is mad, but won’t stress over it in the meantime



Once your identified worry time has passed, put away the worry log. Encourage your thoughts to return to the here and now with an activity that helps calm you down like a mindfulness or grounding skill, or even maybe a shower, arts and crafts or any self care item that works for you.


How worry time can help

Worry time can help in many ways other than just reducing worry frequency and intensity during the day. By using worry time, you are actively practicing and strengthening other coping skills associated with anxiety and depression. Some of these added benefits are listed below.

  • Increases mindful thinking

  • Increases objective thought processes and engages the wise mind

  • Decrease rumination and perseverative thinking

  • Increase emotional regulation



Conclusion

So, as counterintuitive as it may seem, setting up a worry time may be just the trick you have been looking for if your goals are to decrease time spent worrying during the day! For more personalized help to address worry and anxiety, book an appointment with one of our skilled therapists on our website or call (215) 922-5683.


Now we asked a computer to answer some questions about worry time. Enjoy how smart computers have become. Still not quite nuanced enough, but making a lot of progress . . . we are still not sure how we feel about computers getting so smart. we can imagine how easily computers would talk us in circles without ever getting anywhere.

What is worry time? "Worry time" is a technique used to manage and reduce excessive worrying. The technique involves setting aside a specific time each day, usually 20-30 minutes, to focus solely on your worries. During this designated "worry time," you allow yourself to think about and focus on any concerns or worries you have. The idea behind this technique is that by setting aside a specific time to focus on your worries, you're able to address them in a more controlled and structured way, which can help to reduce the amount of time you spend worrying throughout the rest of the day.

Here's how you can implement "worry time" in your life:

  1. Set aside a specific time each day: Choose a time of day when you're typically less busy and can focus on your worries without interruptions.
  2. Write down your worries: Before your designated "worry time," make a list of the things you're worried about. This can help you to focus your thoughts during your worry time.
  3. Refocus your thoughts: If your thoughts wander during worry time, gently bring them back to the task at hand: worrying.
  4. Use problem-solving strategies: During worry time, try to come up with solutions to the problems you're worrying about. If you can't find a solution, try to come up with a plan of action to address the problem.
  5. End worry time with a positive thought: After your designated worry time is over, try to focus on something positive to refocus your thoughts.

It's important to note that "worry time" should not replace professional help if you are struggling with excessive worrying or have a diagnosed anxiety disorder. It's always best to consult with a therapist or counselor to determine the best course of action.

Anxiety Therapy in Philadelphia?

Anxiety therapy in Philadelphia can take many forms, and different types of therapy may be more appropriate for different individuals. Some common types of anxiety therapy that are available in Philadelphia include:

  1. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT): This type of therapy focuses on identifying and changing negative thought patterns and behaviors that contribute to anxiety.
  2. Exposure therapy: This type of therapy involves gradually exposing an individual to the object or situation that causes anxiety in order to reduce fear and anxiety.
  3. Mindfulness-based therapies: These therapies teach individuals to focus on the present moment and be mindful of their thoughts and feelings, which can help to reduce anxiety.
  4. Medication: In some cases, medication may be prescribed by a psychiatrist or physician to manage symptoms of anxiety.
  5. Acceptance and Commitment therapy (ACT): This type of therapy focuses on teaching individuals to accept and make peace with difficult thoughts and feelings, rather than trying to suppress or eliminate them.
  6. Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR): This type of therapy has been found to be effective in treating post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other conditions related to traumatic events.

You can find anxiety therapy in Philadelphia by searching online for "anxiety therapy in Philadelphia" or "Philadelphia anxiety therapist" and you'll find multiple options of therapists or clinics that provide anxiety therapy. You can also check with your insurance provider, they may have a list of covered providers in your area.

It's important to note that the type of therapy that's right for you will depend on your specific needs and symptoms, so it's best to consult with a therapist or counselor to determine the best course of treatment.

Anxiety Therapy in Mechanicsville?

Anxiety therapy in Mechanicsville, Virginia can take many forms, different types of therapy may be more appropriate for different individuals. Some common types of anxiety therapy that may be available in Mechanicsville include:

  1. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT): This type of therapy focuses on identifying and changing negative thought patterns and behaviors that contribute to anxiety.
  2. Exposure therapy: This type of therapy involves gradually exposing an individual to the object or situation that causes anxiety in order to reduce fear and anxiety.
  3. Mindfulness-based therapies: These therapies teach individuals to focus on the present moment and be mindful of their thoughts and feelings, which can help to reduce anxiety.
  4. Medication: In some cases, medication may be prescribed by a psychiatrist or physician to manage symptoms of anxiety.
  5. Acceptance and Commitment therapy (ACT): This type of therapy focuses on teaching individuals to accept and make peace with difficult thoughts and feelings, rather than trying to suppress or eliminate them.
  6. Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR): This type of therapy has been found to be effective in treating post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other conditions related to traumatic events.

You can find anxiety therapy in Mechanicsville by searching online for "anxiety therapy in Mechanicsville" or "Therapist for anxiety in Mechanicsville" and you'll find multiple options of therapists or clinics that provide anxiety therapy. You can also check with your insurance provider, they may have a list of covered providers in your area.

It's important to remember that the type of therapy that's right for you will depend on your specific needs and symptoms, so it's best to consult with a therapist or counselor to determine the best course of treatment.

Anxiety in Ocean City? Anxiety therapy in Ocean City can take many forms, and different types of therapy may be more appropriate for different individuals. Some common types of anxiety therapy that may be available in Ocean City include:

  1. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT): This type of therapy focuses on identifying and changing negative thought patterns and behaviors that contribute to anxiety.
  2. Exposure therapy: This type of therapy involves gradually exposing an individual to the object or situation that causes anxiety in order to reduce fear and anxiety.
  3. Mindfulness-based therapies: These therapies teach individuals to focus on the present moment and be mindful of their thoughts and feelings, which can help to reduce anxiety.
  4. Medication: In some cases, medication may be prescribed by a psychiatrist or physician to manage symptoms of anxiety.
  5. Acceptance and Commitment therapy (ACT): This type of therapy focuses on teaching individuals to accept and make peace with difficult thoughts and feelings, rather than trying to suppress or eliminate them.
  6. Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR): This type of therapy has been found to be effective in treating post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other conditions related to traumatic events.

You can find anxiety therapy in Ocean City by searching online for "anxiety therapy in Ocean City" or "Therapist for anxiety in Ocean City" and you'll find multiple options of therapists or clinics that provide anxiety therapy. You can also check with your insurance provider, they may have a list of covered providers in your area.

It's important to remember that the type of therapy that's right for you will depend on your specific needs and symptoms, so it's best to consult with a therapist or counselor to determine the best course of treatment.





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