Janette Dill, MFT (Associate Therapist)

Janette Dill, MFT (she/her) is a graduate of LaSalle University’s Marriage and Family Therapy Program which included a one year internship where she worked with individuals, couples, and family systems. Added to that list due to a large demand at The Center For Growth is Sex Therapy which could be exlplored as an individual and/or couple. Post graduate experience has drawn a clinical concentration that has focused on individuals with phases of life transitions, improving work-life balance, anxiety, depression, low self esteem, and grief and loss. Sex therapy may includes exploring sexuality, improving sexual satisfaction, fetishes, increasing intimacy, boundaries, rules, safe sex play.

Janette Dill, MFT (she/her) is a graduate of LaSalle University’s Marriage and Family Therapy Program which included a one year internship where she worked with individuals, couples, and family systems. Added to that list due to a large demand at The Center For Growth is Sex Therapy which could be exlplored as an individual and/or couple. Post graduate experience has drawn a clinical concentration that has focused on individuals with phases of life transitions, improving work-life balance, anxiety, depression, low self esteem, and grief and loss. Sex therapy may includes exploring sexuality, improving sexual satisfaction,fetishes,increasing intimacy, boundaries, rules, safe sex play.

The family work I have treated clinically has largely followed a structural model. This approach is designed to focus on the systemic structure of the family, or lack thereof, and how to repair that if needed. As well as, looking at the interactions between members and how to restructure them in a more healthy way to benefit the system overall. This approach encourages creating strong foundations and boundaries within the system to be able to adapt to psychological or emotional needs of its members, such as parent child conflict. Home structure and environment play an integral part in our identity as we develop as adults. Family therapy allows me to see each individual as a unique and valuable part of a larger system. Every member plays a role within the system. This approach helps members to value each other in conjunction with those roles. Families are complex, not all look and function the same. The issues that resulted in the decision to start therapy were created over time and will not be solved quickly. Think of family therapy like renovating a home. It will take time, energy, compromising, planning, patience, understanding, and acknowledging some hard truths, which could lead to improved functioning as a unit. While this is the model I primarily use it isn’t the only one that can be utilized depending on the presenting issue.



The couples I have had the pleasure to work with have come in for help co-parenting, infidelity, broken trust, relationship dissatisfaction, balancing roles, deeper emotional connection, and trying to change their partner, and figuring out why they are stuck, increasing intimacy or sexual satisfacton. One of the largest chief complaints that comes up for couples seeking treatment is communication issues. Communication is an umbrella term in the therapy world. All of the clients that I have worked with have the ability to verbally articulate their words, so what really is the issue? I have each participant break down what communication issues mean to them, reflecting on how you will know that your communication skills have gotten better. What do you expect to see, hear, feel, from you and your partner? That allows my clients to paint the roadmap for their partner and me as the therapist. It assigns the clients accountability in the sense that to get from point A to point B(your version of improved communication) is going to require active participation on both participants' behalf.

When working with couples I encourage mutual respect of differences, facilitating areas of growth as a way to maintain partnership, and hopefully improve overall relationship satisfaction or a space to part amicably if need be. For example, a couple working on communication will learn skills such as “I statements', which emphasize accountability for how you feel, listening to understand versus listening to respond, learning when to table the conversation and how to reconvene when both partners have had a chance to calm down and reduce emotional reactivity. Lastly, how to reconvene and finish the conversation in a manner where I look for areas of strength and work with the couple to translate those skills to the areas of needed attention. Couples therapy works best when all partners want to improve the satisfaction of the relationship

What exactly is a Marriage and Family Therapist anyway?

While the decision to start therapy may have not been an easy one, I commend you for starting the journey. I pride myself on creating an open and safe space for my clients to process and express themselves freely. While therapy isn’t designed to fix you, as we don’t fix people, but give individuals the tools to improve themselves with some assistance.

What exactly is a Marriage and Family Therapist anyway?



I have always wanted to help others within my career choices. My previous profession allowed me to help people in hospital or medical settings. As a therapist I hope to gain understanding and insight from my clients, just as much as they hope to gain something from their therapeutic journey.

While working with my clients I am always thinking systemically.

I look forward to meeting you!




NPI: 1366118507

Licensure:

  • Pennsylvania: Working towards licensure in PA

Janette Dill, MFT (Associate Therapist)’s Latest TIPs:

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