Changing All or Nothing Thinking | Counseling | Therapy

Changing All Or Nothing Thinking : Therapy in Philadelphia Ocean City

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Nawaal Amer (Intern Therapist) photo

Nawaal Amer (Intern Therapist)

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Dan Spiritoso, MS (Associate Therapist)

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Raegan Galleher (Intern Therapist)

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Roomi Kunuria (Intern Therapist)

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Ella Chrelashvili, MA (Associate Therapist)

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Jordan Pearce, MA, LAC, NCC (Associate Therapist)

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Emily Davis, MS (Associate Therapist)

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Farhana Ferdous, MA, ATR (Associate Therapist)

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Jonah Taylor, LSW (Associate Therapist)

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Lancie Mazza, LCSW (Therapist & Director Of Virginia Office)

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Margaret (Meg) Fromuth, LMFT (Therapist & Web Development Support)

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Georgine Atacan, MSW, LSW (Associate Therapist)

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Richard (Rick) Snyderman, LPC, CADC, CSAT, NCC (Therapist & Director of Support Groups)

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Samantha Eisenberg, LCSW, MSW, MEd, LMT, (Therapist)

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Erica Goldblatt Hyatt DSW, LCSW, MBE (Therapist)

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Jennifer Foust, Ph.D., M.S., LPC, ACS (Clinical Director)

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Tonya McDaniel, MEd, MSW, LCSW (Therapist & Director of Professional Development)

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Shannon Oliver-O'Neil, LCSW (Therapist & Director of Intern Program)

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Cognitive Therapy in Philadelphia: Changing All or Nothing Thinking

How do I change ‘all or nothing thinking’? All-or-nothing thinking, also known as black-and-white thinking, is a type of cognitive bias that can lead to negative thoughts and feelings. Changing this type of thinking can be challenging, but it is possible with the right tools and strategies. To change all or nothing thinking, start by identifying when you are thinking in all or nothing terms. You may want to write these all or nothing thoughts down in a journal. If you are unable to journal then just try to be more aware of your thought patterns.

  1. Identifying and labeling the thought: The first step in changing all-or-nothing thinking is to recognize when it's happening. When you notice yourself thinking in absolutes, try to label the thought as "all-or-nothing" thinking.
  2. Examining the evidence: When you're caught in all-or-nothing thinking, it can be helpful to examine the evidence for and against your thoughts. Ask yourself: "Is this thought really true? Is there any evidence that contradicts it?" Then think of ways you can correct it. For example, if you have a thought such as “I messed up by eating this piece of cake, so now I might as well eat the whole cake.” Take note that this is ‘ all or nothing thinking’. So instead, try saying ok this is my ‘all or nothing thinking’. I ate this piece of cake and I wish I had not but it does matter if I stop now. Eating one or two pieces is not the same as eating an entire cake and I am going to stop now.
  3. Using "gray" language: Instead of using black-and-white language, try to use more "gray" language to describe situations and experiences. Instead of saying "I always fail," try saying "I sometimes struggle." This can help to break down rigid thinking and see situations in a more nuanced way.
  4. Practicing mindfulness: Mindfulness techniques such as meditation and deep breathing can help to calm the mind and reduce the frequency of negative thoughts.

It's important to remember that changing all-or-nothing thinking takes time and effort, and it is a process that may require patience and persistence. However, with the right tools and support, it is possible to break free from this type of thinking and develop a more balanced and positive perspective.

Seeking therapy: Professional therapy can be very helpful in changing all-or-nothing thinking. A therapist can help you to identify and challenge negative thought patterns and provide you with tools and strategies for managing them.You don't have to do it alone. Call The Center for Growth at 215-922-5683 Ext. 100. We offer therapy in Society Hill, Philly, Ocean City, NJ, Richmond, VA, and Santa Fe, NM. We also offer telehealth therapy in Georgia and Florida.

InPerson Therapy & Virtual Counseling: Child, Teens, Adults, Couples, Family Therapy and Support Groups. Anxiety, OCD, Panic Attack Therapy, Depression Therapy, FND Therapy, Grief Therapy, Neurodiversity Counseling, Sex Therapy, Trauma Therapy: Therapy in Providence RI, Philadelphia PA, Ocean City NJ, Santa Fe NM, Mechanicsville VA